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Healthcare Professionals Urged to Participate in National Stroke Awareness Month


The National Stroke Association and the American Stroke Association provide free resources that medical providers can share across multiple channels.

By Bisk on May 06, 2014
Healthcare Professionals Urged to Participate in National Stroke Awareness Month

About 10% of all strokes occur in hospitalized patients; according to a recent study, their outcomes correlated with the knowledge of the hospital staff.

In all, about 795,000 people in the United States suffer strokes each year, but only 4% of patients are appropriately treated, according to the National Stroke Association. A favorable relies on quick medical intervention, regardless of where it occurs, which makes knowing the symptoms of a stroke as important for the public as it is for healthcare providers and facility staff.

During National Stroke Awareness Month in May, the National Stroke Association and the American Stroke Association encourage nurses, doctors and the public to aid in fostering awareness of the nation’s fourth leading cause of death.

Think F.A.S.T.

Nurses and other healthcare providers should review their knowledge of the symptoms of stroke, a study suggests, and share information with patients. Both the National Stroke Association and the American Stroke Association provide free resources that can be shared across a variety of channels, from chat rooms to waiting rooms.

The most important information to pass along to patients and caregivers? Thinking F.A.S.T.

In a study of patients who had a stroke, someone other than the patient decided to seek medical treatment in 66% of the cases. The American Stroke Association’s free F.A.S.T. app is designed to help users determine if emergency treatment is needed; immediate intervention can save lives and prevent stroke-related disabilities.

The app, available for iPhone and Android, features helpful resources and instructions for how to spot a stroke “F.A.S.T.”

F= Face         Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?

A= Arms         Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S= Speech    Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Does the speech sound slurred or strange?

T= Time         If you observe any of these signs, it’s time to call 9-1-1.

Get Involved

The American Stroke Association plans to host a Twitter chat series led by medical experts from across the U.S. beginning May 14.  Its Stroke Resource Center provides materials that healthcare providers can customize to help educate patients.

As part of its yearlong 30th anniversary commemoration, which kicked off in April, the National Stroke Association is encouraging the public to share Messages of Hope with people recovering from a stroke.

The organization aims to assemble a collection of messages that will “help stroke survivors persevere on the road to recovery by reinforcing the importance of never giving up,” according to a media release.

The American Stroke Association’s volunteer-powered Tips for Daily Living Library is gathering ideas from nurses, doctors, stroke survivors, caregivers and others who found innovative ways to overcome stroke-related challenges. Submit a video tip, written tip or photo tip online and receive a free AHA/ASA cookbook and Stroke Solidarity String.

Both the American Stroke Association and National Stroke Association have event calendars that list activities across the country that healthcare providers and the public can participate in.

Category: Healthcare